Lindley Mills Stoneground Corn GritsLindley Mills has been milling organic corn in an area of the country affectionately nicknamed the “Grits Belt” since colonial times, so it’s no surprise that we’re serious about the craft and tradition that goes into making our grits. Aside from flour, grits are the kind of food we’d be happy to eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner—every single day, which is why we’re so particular about the difference between just ‘good’ and our outstanding grits.

This holiday season we are offering a limited-edition batch of our famous 100% Organic Old-Fashioned Stoneground Yellow Corn Grits! For more than 35 years, we have been milling these coarsely-ground grits for chefs who want a taste of a true southern ingredient in their creations. We are finally able to offer our grits in 2 lb. packages, shipped directly to your door through our e-commerce business.

Ordering: How it works

Place your online order for Lindley Mills’ Old-Fashioned Stoneground Yellow Corn Grits prior to midnight on Wednesday, November 16th, 2016. On Thursday and Friday November 17th and 18th, we will be packing and shipping out all of the orders for delivery just in time to arrive for Thanksgiving or a hearty breakfast before your Black Friday shopping spree.

Any orders we receive between November 17th and December 18th will be packaged and shipped early the week of December 19th so they can arrive in time to be given as a gift or eaten as a treat on Christmas morning.

 

Fair Meadow BakesToday we would like to extend our appreciation to Pat and Jay Gaddis, owners of Fair Meadow Bakes in Mt. Pleasant, NC. Fair Meadow Bakes is a home bakery fired by a brick-and-mortar pizza oven that was constructed by Jay in 2008.

Fair Meadow Bakes uses organic, locally milled flour from Lindley Mills in their incredible array of baked goods that can be found at Stanly County Farmers Markets in North Carolina. Not only are they feeding their local community with nutritious naturally-leavened bread, they are also fostering community with their Friday and Saturday night pizza dinner tradition. Pat and Jay are committed to educating local friends and neighbors about the benefits of eating sprouted grains and naturally-leavened bread, and are big fans of our Super Sprout™ Sprouted Whole Grain Wheat Flour.  They frequently hold artisan bread baking classes including demonstrations on baking with sprouted grains. Thanks for being great customers and for sharing the beauty of good bread (and pizza) with all those around you!

For updates or to attend an upcoming artisan bread baking class, follow Fair Meadow Bakes on Facebook, and be sure to visit them the next time you're in the area. Pat and Jay would be happy to host you at their table. Be sure to tell them we sent you! 

Click here to read more in our customer appreciation post series. 

 

As a small, family-owned mill, we strive to maintain personal relationships with our customers. We truly appreciate the bakers who support what we do, and we are committed to continuing to mill only the highest quality organic flour for our customers. Today's post is the first in a series of "Customer Appreciation" posts that we will be sharing here to honor and celebrate all the bakers who support our family business by feeding their craft and communities with the best organic ingredients available!

saxapahaw village bakehouse nc

Today's Customer Appreciation is a shout out to one of our favorite local bakeries, Saxapahaw Village Bakehouse! We appreciate having access to tasty, high-quality baked goods (like the pistachio white chocolate muffin pictured below) in our neighborhood.

Head Baker, John and his hard-working team of bakers use Lindley Mills flour and other locally-sourced ingredients to whip-up daily magic from their kitchen inside The Eddy Pub. 

Taste their baked goods at The Eddy Pub, Left Bank Butchery, and CUP 22 at The Haw River Ballroom to support our wonderful local food community on your next visit to Saxapahaw, North Carolina.

 

baking is alchemyWe talk a lot about using "quality" wheat in our flours, but how do we ensure the best possible organic products reach our customers?

It is the Miller’s job to transform the dormant wheat seed into flour so that it can be used by bakers and cooks to its full potential. Part of the craft includes knowing about different types of flour and how they will perform for the baker. Our Miller and President, Joe Lindley, has decades of experience listening to bakers and making flour that will help them bake more flavorful, nutritious, and consistent breads. Today, we are tackling protein, which is a common “measuring stick” for wheat. We will explain how the type and quality of protein in your flour can influence the bread you create.

LIND LOGO FinalThis week, we have been sharing a series of blogs posts to commemorate the 235th anniversary of the Battle of Lindley’s mill, a Revolutionary War battle that happened on the same ground where our mill stands today. Learn more about the significance of the battle and see the entire series of articles on our blog, here. Today we would like to wrap up our week of reflection by sharing our thoughts on the traditions and values we’ve learned from our ancestors.

Tradition and values are an important part of the way we live our lives and the lens through which we do business. As we think about the products we’re providing to our friends and neighbors, we believe our ancestors would be proud of how we have continued milling with the traditions and values of their time. Our milling standard is high, but it’s simple. And it’s the same principle on which Lindley’s Mill was founded in 1755: We only produce high-quality milled products that we would want to eat, ourselves. The standards of quality are a blend of tradition, technology, and cutting-edge innovation. It’s the core of what we value, but here are other things we value, too.

1775 Lindleys Mill Map Alamance County NCThis past Tuesday marked the 235th anniversary of the Battle of Lindley’s Mill, and we’re honoring this important moment in our collective history all week long. Read our blog on the Battle of Lindley’s Mill here, and be sure to check back with us to continue reading more in this series. Today we will go back to the early 1700s, where the first settlers began building the foundation for a thriving community around what we still know today as Lindley’s Mill.

Agricultural Roots

The deepest of our agricultural roots here in Alamance County reach back to the small Native American villages. The native people of the Haw River (the Sissipihaw) lived bountifully off the land in the North Carolina Piedmont through hunting, fishing and farming for thousands of years before the Europeans arrived.

When the first Europeans began to settle the area, they established family farms in the hilly and fertile soil of the region. Many Quakers of English and Irish descent, like our own Thomas Lindley, settled around the Cane Creek area near what is now called Snow Camp. These early settlers had to meet their basic needs of food, water, and shelter. They grew wheat, corn, oats, and rye successfully and soon gristmills popped up along Cane Creek in order to make flour to feed the community. Both the Haw River and Cane Creek were crucial to the agricultural (and later on) the textile industries of our region--both as a source of drinking water as well as a source of hydropower for the mills.